Notes


Note    N3402         Index
Lee worked as a bookkeeper. Millie was a teacher.

Notes


Note    N3403         Index
In 1930, a Walter Brann, aged 69 and born in Maine, was living in Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio, with his wife, Josephine, who was aged 75 and born in Ohio (T626, Roll 1790, E.D. 22-15, Page 58B).

Notes


Note    N3406         Index
Victor was a farmer in West Poland, New Gloucester and Gray, Maine.

Notes


Note    N3407         Index
Frank Scribner was an engineer. He had been living in Hartford, Connecticut, prior to his marriage to Aurilla. After their marriage, they both worked in a local shoe factory.

Notes


Note    N3408         Index
Charles was a farmer in Otisfield and Casco.

Notes


Note    N3409         Index
Mary died from a paralytic stroke suffered 10 days prior to her death. She is remembered as "a woman of lovable character whose friendship was prized by everyone who knew her."

Notes


Note    N3414         Index
Benjamin was a Contractor.

Notes


Note    N3416         Index
"Howard was a good-natured fellow and worked in the woods with his horses" (Kluge, 349). In his obituary, he is remembered as "a good friend and cheery neighbor,"

Notes


Note    N3417         Index
Carlton was a farmer in Casco, Maine.

Notes


Note    N3423         Index
Philip was a grocer for most of his life, except during the last 12 years of life when he was in the railway business.

Notes


Note    N3424         Index
Philip was a railroader.

Notes


Note    N3428         Index
Nellie was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Her DAR ID Number was 159990. In her application for DAR membership, she listed some of the dates pertaining to some family members (her mother's date of death, and her maternal grandparents' dates of birth, marriage and death).

Notes


Note    N3429         Index
Everett was a tailor, and operated a clothing store in Westborough, Massachusetts. He and Nellie had no children.

Notes


Note    N3430         Index
Daniel owned and operated a bakery shop in Hudson, Massachusetts.

Notes


Note    N3435         Index
Addie had an extramarital affair with William "Billy" Soule (b. 2 May 1860 in Phillips, ME, d. 2 September 1934 in Oxbow, ME) which resulted in the birth of Wallace Dickerson Nevel. She was staying with relatives in Hudson, Michigan, when she gave birth to Wallace. That birth followed by one year the birth of Addie's second son, Verne Ottignon.

 Addie was the owner of an Andover, Maine, millinery and general store, which she opened, first, in April 1884, a venture that did not last long. In the 27 May 1884 issue of the "Oxford Democrat" is the local news item that "Mrs. C.H. Ottignon has taken rooms at Mr. Stone's and is closing out at cost." Three years later, in April 1887, it seems likely that she re-opened her shop in Andover. An item in the Andover Locals in the 24 May 1887 edition of the "Oxford Democrat" states that "Andover has been 'taken' by an invasion of milliners from neighboring towns." In the 27 September 1887 issue, it is said that "Andover is suffering from both photographic and millinery invasions. Many have been taken by the knight of the camera and more have surrendered to the embellishment of head gear." We are not sure if Addie was the only, or one of, the milliners in question.
 During that three-year hiatus from Andover:
       1. Addie and Charles spent several months (the remainder of 1884 and much of 1885) as managers of Camp Kennebago, a dormitory for members of the Oquossoc Angling Association at Indian Rock, near Rangeley, Maine, then, at some point,
       2. Addie moved out to Hudson, Michigan, to live with relatives while she was pregnant with Verne, who was born there in June 1886. One year later, in June 1887, Wallace "Dick" Nevel was born there. It seems likely that Addie returned to Maine following Verne's birth. Within a few months after her return to Maine, she became pregnant with Wallace. A local news item from Andover in the 25 January 1887 "Oxford Democrat" states that "Mrs. C.H. Ottignon is in town and will probably spend the winter here."
 If Addie were in Andover in April and May of 1887, she must have been in the latter months of her pregnancy, carrying Wallace. In order for him to be born in Michigan, she must have made a quick trip out there, and then, after he was born, returned to Andover.

 In 1894, she moved to Paris Hill to open a temporary business location, perhaps only for the upcoming term of Oxford County Superior Court. A news item regarding this venture appears in the 17 April 1894 edition of "The Oxford Democrat." Addie placed an ad in the 18 May 1894 edition, announcing that she would "open a select line of Millinery Novelties on May 3rd, and continue through the season at my Millinery Parlors at the house of Mrs. A. F. Mason, Paris Hill." This venture ended with the close of the Court Session, and, as the following paragraph indicates, she was back in Andover by August.

 A tragic affair took place on Monday, 6 August 1894. Lyman Small (Addie's uncle and her father's brother) was shot by Oxford County Deputy Sheriff C.M. Wormell while resisting arrest. He died three days later. The episode is recorded in the 14 August 1892 edition of "The Oxford Democrat" newspaper (Page 2).
 The reason for that shooting stems from a long and bitter family feud. Addie's father, Joshua, had died in 1890, leaving real estate and property in Andover. His heirs, daughters Addie and Sarah Eda, both claimed title to that property. Through several lawsuits entered over several terms of Oxford County Superior Court, the two fought each other for the property for years. Finally, at the last May, 1894, term of court, they were persuaded to refer the matter to Judge Whitehouse, with his decision to be final. The contentious hearing lasted all of one day and evening, and was terminated the next morning by the departure of the stage on which the court officers left town. The judge's decision was to award to Sarah Eda (now Mrs. Grant C. Royal) a certain portion of the real estate (incuding the house) in Andover village. Necessary legal proceedings were carried out to give her title to the property, and she went to take possession of the property.
 However, Joshua's brother, Lyman Small, also claimed title to the property by virtue of some previous transaction between him and Joshua. So, when Sarah Eda arrived, Lyman forcibly ejected her from the premises. She immediately went to Bethel and swore out an arrest warrant, charging Lyman with assault. The warrant was given to Deputy Wormell, and he left for Andover to carry out the warrant. He arrived in Andover about 5:00 a.m on Monday, and told Lyman about the warrant. Lyman said that he would be ready after breakfast, so Deputy Wormell went to the hotel to wait for him.
 While the deputy was gone, Addie appeared and told Lyman not to give up the property. When Deputy Wormell learned that Lyman was going to resist him, and quite likely a fight would ensue, he summoned several men of the village to assist him.
 When they arrived at the house, they found that Lyman had barricaded the door and all the windows on the first floor, and was standing at a second-floor window with rifle in hand. Addie was in the front yard, loudly warning the officer not to attempt to enter the house. Lyman threatened to shoot the first man who touched the door. At the deputy's command, the men rushed to the door to break it in. Lyman pulled the trigger on the rifle, but it failed to fire.
 Once inside the house, Deputy Wormell found himself standing at the foot of the stairway to the second floor, with Lyman standing at the head of those stairs. Lyman was armed with the rifle, and a long butcher's knife protruded from the opening of his coat. Near him lay an axe and a heavy butcher's cleaver.
 As the deputy attempted to reason with Lyman, to each argument Lyman replied, "My body is my own and I am going to protect it." As he talked, the deputy (who had drawn his pistol) was slowly making his way up the stairs, with Lyman continually warning him not to come any closer. When Wormell was halfway up the stairway, Lyman pointed the rifle at him and pulled the trigger. Again, it failed to fire.
    Wormell started for Lyman, and Lyman swung at him with the axe, grazing his chest and neck. A second blow struck the deputy's arms in such a way that the axe fell out of Lyman's hands and flew down the stairway, grazing one man's head and landing harmlessly at the bottom of the stairs.
 Lyman then grabbed the cleaver and drew back, ready to strike the deputy with it. Wormell, realizing this was a matter of life and death between them, fired at Lyman with his pistol. The bullet struck Lyman in the chest, but didn't slow him down. He followed through with his attack with the cleaver, but missed. It fell among the people below, narrowly missing another of the men.
 By this time, Lyman was on the floor. He grabbed the rifle and propped himself up, and said "I tell you, man, I am not a going with you, and if you come up here you are a dead man." He allowed noone to come to his aid and attend to his wound. All the while, after Lyman was shot, Addie (who had not ceased to talk and threaten during the entire proceeding), fell over in hysterics, crying uncontrollably. The crisis had ended.
 After a full hearing, a verdict was returned exonerating Deputy Wormell from all blame, since he acted in self-defense. Addie soon left Andover for good.

 In 1900, she was living in Wilmington, Vermont, with her sons, 18-year-old Joshua, and 13-year-old Verne. She lists her occupation as "milliner."

 In 1910, Addie was living in Norwood (south of Boston), Massachusetts, apparently still operating a millinery shop (NARA Microcopy T624, Roll 609, Vol. 93, E.D. 1132, Page 35B). However, her time there was short. Addie died from a cerebral hemorrhage while living at the Brattleboro Retreat, a mental health facility in Brattleboro, Vermont, where she had lived since 14 August 1912.